The Australian Women’s Health Charter

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network, 2016

Status – CURRENT

The Australian Women’s Health Charter seeks to influence all political parties in the lead up the 2016 Federal election. It calls on them, if elected, to commit to national leadership in taking action to ensure the health and well-being needs of all women in Australia are met.

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Health and the Primary Prevention of Violence against Women

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network, July 2014

Status – CURRENT

This position paper focuses on the primary prevention of violence perpetrated by men against women. It develops a position on primary prevention (as distinct from secondary and tertiary interventions). It also identifies examples of good practice across settings, and factors for success for primary prevention programs. The paper has been developed as a resource for public education, debate and community activities related to the primary prevention of violence against women.

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Women and NonCommunicable Diseases (Chronic Conditions)

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network, 2014

Status – CURRENT

This position paper examines the gender dimensions of non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory conditions, and musculo-skeletal condition, to raise awareness, and to inform prevention and treatment guidelines. Building on the inequities for women documented in the AWHN Position Paper on Women’s Health and Wellbeing,this paper highlights the specific areas where gender blindness is occurring and the areas where change is needed.

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The Impact on Women’s Health of Climatic and Economic Disaster

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network, April 2014

Status – CURRENT

The paper begins with an overview of the climatic and economic drivers of inequality,then provides evidence of ongoing injustice for women – the context within which women experience climatic and economic disaster.

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Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network, 2012

Status – CURRENT

This paper advocates for a rights-based approach to ensuring all women can access comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care appropriate to their needs,regardless of their location, age, sexuality, financial status and religious and cultural background. It explores seven key areas through which good sexual and reproductive health for Australian women can be achieved. These are:promoting positive and respectful attitudes to sex and sexuality;developing women’s health literacy; increasing reproductive choice; facilitating women’s health throughout pregnancy and birth;expanding prevention and treatment of reproductive cancers and menstrual issues; improving prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs); and equipping the health workforce to better respond to women’s health needs.

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Women and Mental Health

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network, 2012

Status – CURRENT

This paper provides research and recommendations for the improvement of policy and services for mental health in women. It looks at the determinants of mental ill health in women, meeting the needs of women, service delivery and research and education, and provides recommendations in each of these areas.

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WOMEN AND HEALTH REFORM

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network,2012

Status – CURRENT

This paper examines health reforms in the context of women’s health, gender analysis and gender mainstreaming.

Gender analysis can add value to decision making about health reforms by making visible potential impacts on women who are central to the functioning and capacity of the formal and informal health systems.

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Women and health and well-being : position paper

Published: Australian Women’s Health Network 2012

Status – CURRENT

Women in Australia have fewer financial resources, less wealth and property, and higher family burdens in the dual economies of paid and unpaid work than their male counterparts. They ensure the reproduction, well-being and survival of others, from newborn to old age, but often lack necessary support and financial independence. There are specific groups of women whose health is significantly compromised by their exposure to risk and social experiences. In particular, the poor standard of health of Indigenous women, refugee women and women with disabilities raises concerns about the capacity of health services to meet their needs. This paper considers the means by which Australian health programs and policy can redress these inequities. It further highlights the inequities for women in relation to non-communicable diseases (chronic diseases). The social gradient, the health sector, and gender are key determinants of health equity for women. The health sector in Australia has a responsibility to improve equity; however, prevailing inconsistencies in its understanding of how gender impacts on women’s health outcomes currently inhibit effective action. The paper argues broadly for recognition of a number of principles essential to establishing a firm basis upon which to redress health inequities for women. [Executive summary, extract]

 

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Women’s health : the new national agenda : position paper

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network, 2008

Status – NOT CURRENT

The purpose of this position paper is to set out a new national agenda for women’s health in Australia. It does so by outlining the key arguments for making women’s health a priority of governments, health professionals and the broader community and proposes a framework and process through which this can be achieved.

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Abortion Policy

Publisher: Australian Women’s Health Network, 2002

Status – CURRENT

The Australian Women’s Health Network recognises that access to safe termination of pregnancy services is an important women’s health issue but that there is a wide range of ethical and religious beliefs regarding abortion in the Australian community. Despite the diversity of views, the vast majority of Australians support a woman’s right to choose.

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